Architectural Trail

St Cuthbert's Trail

Located at Brighton Bay Street, the St Cuthbert’s Trail is 2.8 kilometres long with a walking time of 50 minutes. The trail path has gentle undulations.

Following is a description of the properties along the route.

 St Cuthbert's Architectural Trail (PDF, 856KB)

Former ES&A Bank (ANZ Bank)
Address: 279 Bay St, Brighton (cnr Asling St)
Style: Gothic Revival
Architects: Terry & Oakden
Date: 1882

Features:
• Home to Brighton’s first bank (ES&A) from 1882 to 2002.
• ES&A merged with ANZ in 1970.
• Many ES&A banks were designed in Gothic Revival style by William Wardell, including the head office (Gothic Bank) in Collins Street, Melbourne which is executed in tuck-pointed brick.
Steeply sloped roof has gabled ends capped with unpainted cement render.
• Window and door heads painted and finished with cement render and adorned with flower motifs.
• A small portico projecting from the symmetric façade features the word ‘Bank’ embossed on either side, with other text formed in rendered panels.

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Former Commercial Bank
Address: 282–284 Bay St, Brighton (cnr St Andrews St)
Style: Renaissance Revival
Architect: Lloyd Tayler
Date: 1890

Features:
• Second bank in Brighton, relocated from corner of Bay and Cochrane Streets.
• Very large and grand for a suburban bank, demonstrating wealth of the area at that time.
• Rear and upper floor were originally a four-bedroom residence for the manager.
• Looks similar to a town hall and dominates the corner site.
• Uncharacteristically built with attached shop and residence in matching style.

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Eco Townhouses
Address: 125 St Andrews St, Brighton
Style: Neo Modern
Architect: Luke Middleton (EME Group)
Date: 2005

Features:
• Incorporates four townhouses that demonstrate EME Group’s commitment to water reduction
Fitted with two 10,000-litre water tanks to flush toilets and water gardens.
• Environmental sustainability has influenced design.
• Building oriented to the north to allow passive solar gain, with double-glazed windows used to reduce heat transfer.
• Design responds to surrounding commercial and residential dwellings in a playful manner and includes reinterpretation of a Victorian-style verandah, contrasted with a solid building form.

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Seagrove
Address: 12 Middle Cres, Brighton
Style: Italianate
Architect: Unknown
Date: 1877

Features:
• Built for dairyman W. Durrant, Seagrove, it is an example of pisé construction (or rammed earth), consisting of beach sand, lime and beach stones.
• Featured in the book Early Melbourne Architecture 1840–1888.
• Built when neat villas were replacing vernacular cottages of the 1850s.
• Single-storey Victorian villa with a concave-profile verandah supported on coupled timber posts.
• Large Moreton Bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) in the front garden may be as old as the house.
• Provides a rare glimpse into middle-class life of the 1880s..

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Kilkerran
Address: 6 William St, Brighton
Style: Italianate
Architect: Unknown, (possibly Charles Webb)
Date: 1885

Features:
• Built for merchant Robert Wilson
• Dominated by a distinctive classical portico with black-and-white marble floor tiles.
• Stands above others in the area and visible from a distance.
• Window decoration includes cast-iron balconettes and architrave mouldings
• Upper floor is notably restrained compared with lower floor.
• Building exterior is rendered brick with ashlar coursing; fine lines ruled in the render that give an appearance of stonework.
• Appears never to have been painted, but recently renovated in keeping with its original state.
• Robert Wilson lived in the house until 1887, then leased to Andrew Jack.
• The Jack family is memorialised in the Lych Gates at St Andrews Church, New Street, Brighton (1857) and the Former Congregational Church, Black Street, Brighton (1875).
• Appears never to have been painted, but recently renovated in keeping with original state..

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St Cuthbert’s Presbyterian Church
Address: 10 Wilson St, Brighton
Style: Gothic Revival
Architect: Evander McIvor
Date: 1889

Features:
• Replaced original and smaller Presbyterian church built to serve the bayside parish from St Kilda to Cheltenham in 1880.
• Fine example of a bichrome Gothic Revival church.
• Horizontal red brick banding enlivens the façade and elaborately decorated doorways create a human scale to the street.
• Stained-glass windows and Fincham organ are notable.
• Four rendered finials project from the gabled square entrance to the east of the church, matching the tall spire finials and contributing to a lively skyline.
Sits on a high point in Brighton as a prominent marker from the surrounding streets.

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Brighton Town Hall
Address: 30 Wilson St, Brighton (cnr Carpenter St)
Style: Renaissance Revival
Architects: Wilson & Beswicke (1885–86), Oakley & Parkes (1933)
Date: 1885–86, 1933

Features:
• Originally housed the Municipal Offices and the Courthouse.
• Characteristic of many town halls built in this era in Victoria.
• Controversial for exceeding £6,000 budget by £2,000.
• Renaissance Revival pilastered façades, prominent tower with clock, balustraded parapet and French Second Empire mansard roof.
• Similar in design to Malvern Town Hall, with corner tower.
Double-height hall with projecting cast-iron portico hosted many great balls, weddings and receptions.
• Oakley & Parkes designed alterations to the interior in 1933 and, 20 years later, Council Chambers to the rear.
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Brighton Civic Centre (City of Brighton Council Offices, City of Bayside Municipal Library)
Address: 15 Boxshall St, Brighton
Style: Modernist
Architect: K F Knight (Oakley & Parkes)
Date: 1959

Features:
• Built to celebrate Brighton’s centenary in 1959 and unusual for its time.
• Considered influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian style and Guggenheim Museum in New York (a link rejected by the architect).
• Sits opposite the Brighton Town Hall, highlighting progression in municipal patronage over 73 years.
• Distinctive cylindrical drum has three bands of brickwork, each projecting slightly from the one below, all seemingly supported on a glass ring.
• Strong, horizontal lines.
• Projecting flat concrete roof of the ground floor enables building to feel less overwhelming and connects circular section with the square section.
• Industrial designer Grant Featherston, forerunner of the post World War II industrial design movement in Australia, designed the peacock blue interior and accompanying furniture.
• Cork oak tree (Quercus suber) on the Boxhall Street boundary is estimated to be nearly 100 years old.

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Residence
Address: 61 St Andrews St, Brighton
Style: Vernacular, Edwardian
Architect: Unknown
Date: pre-1861

Features:
Early bluestone cottage nestled on a corner allotment, originally surrounded by land holdings that extend to the rear.
• Contractor Robert Gall listed as owner/occupant in 1861 (the year of Brighton’s first rate-books).
• Originally built with randomly coursed bluestone which was unusual in Brighton and transported from across the Bay.
• Changes since construction include timber additions at the rear, changes to windows and terracotta-tiled roof flowing onto a verandah supported by turned timber posts, typical of Edwardian period.
• The original element of this charming, simple cottage represents a rare surviving example of mid–19th Century housing in Bayside..

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Residence
Address: 56 Middle Crescent, Brighton
Style: Neo Modern
Architects: Crone Nation
Date: 2005-06

Features:
• Cubic in form, highlights contemporary use of contrasting materials and colours.
• Materials create definition between sections - from rendered front walls to sheet cladding on the upper storey.
• Upper level sheet cladding and windows interestingly set on an angle.
• Timber-slatted fence introduces a natural, organic element to otherwise industrial, hardedged design.

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Residence
Address: 8 Parliament St, Brighton
Style: Italianate
Architect: Unknown
Date: 1876
Features:
• Reflective of hundreds of small double-fronted timber cottages built in Melbourne in the late 19th Century, often featuring hipped roof with a bracketed eave, ‘ashlar’ boards (imitation stone square blocks) on front façade and front verandah.
• Four-bedroom cottage with grand design featuring bell-curve shaped roof, rich cast iron work and tall, arched and pedimented entry portico.
• Striking verandah may be original or added in the boom years of the 1880s as a response to emergence of ubiquitous Brighton towered mansions.
• Recently painted in sympathetic colours that accentuate its ornate features.
• Picket fence in complementary style completes the picture..

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Higinbotham Hall
Address: 104 Bay St, Brighton (cnr Parliament St)
Style: Renaissance Revival
Architects: Treeby & Cutler
Date: 1886–87

Features:
• Opened by local resident and Chief Justice of Victoria, the Hon. George Higinbotham as Brighton’s Public Library, later known as Higinbotham Hall, on 7 May 1887.
• Higinbotham Hall served as a library until June 1978 when service was relocated to the Brighton Town Hall.
• Substantial and ornate symmetrical Renaissance Revival two-storey building.
• Street façade has projecting entry porch, with balcony above and arched windows with modelled keystones on the first floor.
• Set of windows opening onto balcony over entrance are known as ‘Serlian Motif’, from the 16th Century Italian architect Serlio.
• Side elevations are plainer, with simple round arched windows.
• Similar in style to Brighton Town Hall and built one year later, Higinbotham Hall is home to the Brighton Dance Academy and other community organisations..

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Page last updated: 10 Sep 2013