family cycling over bridge

Cycling

Bayside Cycling Strategy

The  Bayside Bicycle Strategy (PDF, 4.4MB) sets Council’s direction for the development of the bicycle network within the municipality and identifies Council’s position in encouraging and supporting more cycling within the Bayside community. With this in mind, Council’s vision for cycling is:

“To increase cycle use throughout Bayside, facilitated through the development of infrastructure which is safe, well connected, convenient and attractive for cyclists and the promotion of cycling as a healthy and sustainable mode of transport.”

Three guiding principles have been developed to work towards this vision. They are:

  • Ensure the provision of high quality bicycle infrastructure across Bayside  – Council will Link existing bicycle facilities and routes both within and outside of Bayside, connect important local destinations and amenities and meet the needs of current and future cyclists.
  • Improve the integration of cycling with land use development, public transport and other key amenities – The provision of end of trip facilities for cyclists and how well cycling is integrated with other sustainable modes of transport will be a major factor in ensuring that cycling is an attractive mode of transport for local trips within Bayside. Council will strengthen the Bayside Planning Scheme to recognise and include travel demand management features, e.g. Travel Plans, and provide secure bicycle parking at key destinations, community events and festivals.
  • Develop a culture of cycling within Bayside that encourages people to ride a bicycle – Council will inform the community about the benefits of cycling, the location of the bicycle network and the places it can take you through a range of promotional activities and encourage people of all ages and abilities to ride a bicycle

Each guiding principle is supported by a range of strategies and actions.

Bicycle parking

On-street bicycle parking facilities

On-street bicycle parking can be found at a range of locations in Bayside, including strip shopping centres, libraries and train stations. On-street bicycle parking is provided in the form of a stainless steel bicycle hoop as shown in the photo below:

When securing your bike to a bicycle hoop remember to:

  • Use a good quality lock
  • Lock both the frame and least one wheel to the bicycle hoop
  • Remove any items that can easily be stolen
  • Park in a well lit location with full public view
  • Ensure that you bike does not block access

On-street bicycle parking requests

To identify an area in Bayside that would benefit from bicycle parking, contact Council’s Transport Planner, Steve Carson, on 9599 4444 or scarson@bayside.vic.gov.au

Parkiteer bike cages at train stations

Parkiteer bike cages provide a convenient, undercover and secure place to park bikes at train stations. Within Bayside there are Parkiteer cages located at both Brighton Beach and Sandringham Stations.

Registration for the use of a Parkiteer bike cage is required and a $50 bond has to be paid for the security swipe card that is used to access the cage. Once registered, the Parkiteer bike cage can be used for free. Further information on Parkiteer bike cages can be obtained from Bicycle Network Victoria on 1800 639 634.

Using shared paths

Shared paths are multi-user paths for people of all ages and paces including pedestrians, joggers, children on scooters or roller-skates, families with prams and dog walkers. They are also used by recreational cyclists, commuting riders, as well as families visiting parks.

Shared paths are designated by a shared path sign and are covered under the road rules.
When using our shared paths, be considerate of other path users. Follow this etiquette to ensure our shared paths are safe and enjoyable for everyone to use.

Shared paths are multi-user paths for people of all ages and paces including pedestrians, joggers, children on scooters or roller-skates, families with prams and dog walkers. They are also used by recreational cyclists, commuting riders, as well as families visiting parks.

Shared paths are designated by a shared path sign and are covered under the road rules.
When using our shared paths, be considerate of other path users. Follow this etiquette to ensure our shared paths are safe and enjoyable for everyone to use.

For cyclists  For walkers 
Cyclists must give way to pedestrians. Pedestrians include people using wheelchairs, mobility scooters and wheeled recreational devices.  Keep to the left.                                          
Ride at an appropriate speed - stay at running pace or below.  Listen out for other path users. 
Keep to the left unless overtaking.  Move to the left when you hear a cyclist's bell or hear a cyclist calling out 'passing'. 
Move off the path when stopped.  Monitor children and control your dog. 
Warn when approaching - slow down when passing others, ring your bell gently and call out 'passing'.  Avoid blocking paths, move off the path when stopped. 
  Be mindful of other users when walking in a group. 
  Check for cyclists when crossing the path.

Sharing roads and paths - Code of Conduct

There is a code of conduct for bike riders, motorists and pedestrians who use and share roads and paths within Victoria.  Sharing Roads and Paths (PDF, 856KB) provides information about rules and safe behaviours when interacting with bicycle riders or when you are riding.

Bicycle riders, drivers, motor bike riders and pedestrians are all legitimate users of the road system.

A guide for all Victorians, Sharing Roads and Paths highlights a number of key elements, including:

  • Be alert
  • Be predictable
  • Be courteous
  • Be visible

Funded by the Victorian Statewide Community Road Safety Partnership and facilitated by the Amy Gillet Foundation, the code of conduct is the result of a major collaborative effort between fourteen of Victoria’s major transport, cycling, pedestrian and motoring groups.

Safe cycling tips

Wear a helmet

Always wear an approved Australian Standards helmet and ensure that it is correctly fitted. Wearing a helmet prevents head injuries. Ensure that the helmet sits firmly and comfortably on your head so that it doesn’t move around.

Light Up

When riding in low light road rules state that you must use a white front light and a rear red light. The front and rear lights must be visible from 200m and the bicycle must also have a red rear reflector. The best lights for bikes are flashing LED units that show others you are there.  Wearing bright or reflective clothing may also help you stand out to other road users.

Bike maintenance

Check that your tyres are fully inflated as this will make for a more comfortable ride and make your tyre more resistant to punctures. The correct tyre pressure will be written on the side wall of the tyre. Check that your brakes are working properly. If your brakes need some adjustment and you are unsure how to do this then take your bike to your local bike shop to have them checked out.

Cycling in traffic

Claim your space and don’t hug the gutter

Be clear about the portion of road that you intend to use whether it is a metre from the kerb or an entire lane. In narrow spaces, sometimes the best way to reduce risk is to claim an entire lane to stop vehicles from squeezing past. Riding away from the gutter will also make you more visible to other road users and you will also avoid any debris that may be swept to the side of the road.

Make your intentions clear

Use hand signals so other road users know that you are moving/turning. Try to use eye contact with other road users – this will help to ensure that they have seen you and to check that they will give way to you when you are signalling to merge in front of them.

Roundabouts

When using a single lane roundabout, as you approach the roundabout move into the middle of the traffic lane. Give way to vehicles already on the roundabout. As you enter the roundabout, look around, make eye contact with drivers.

At those locations where a bicycle lane ends prior to a single lane roundabout, as you approach the roundabout, when it is safe to do so, move out from the bicycle lane into the middle of the traffic lane. Give way to vehicles already on the roundabout. As you enter the roundabout, look around, make eye contact with drivers.

Use hook turns

If you feel that a right hand turn is going to leave you exposed at an intersection use a hook turn.

Car doors

Ride outside of the car door zone

If all cars parked with their doors open, where would you position yourself on the road to be safe? That is where you should aim to be all of the time – far enough out so that your handlebar would not clip an open car door. Riding a metre out from parked cars means that you avoid one of the most common cycling accidents – getting hit by a car door. Stay clear of the door zone and do not weave in and out of empty car parking spaces – keep a straight line.

To avoid doors:

  • Look through car windows for people as they may be about to get out of their vehicle
  • Check in the mirrors of trucks or vans
  • Look out for vehicles that have just parked
  • Look at the tail light’s of vehicles for an indication of people in a vehicle

Commuting by bike

Cycling to work will save you time and money; you will feel fitter and healthier and reduce your impact on the environment. There is no better way to start your day. You will arrive feeling refreshed, energised and ready to go!

If you don't want to ride the whole way to work, think about riding your bike to a train station and parking it there before catching the train to work.

Plan your route

Plan your route carefully to avoid heavy traffic and find the safest and most enjoyable way to get to work. There are many online resources to help you find a good route to work:

Improve your bicycle skills

Think about improving your bicycle skills and confidence in cycling. There are many courses that teach key bicycle skills like learning to set up your bike correctly, checking your bike, recognising hazards and dealing with traffic.

Ride to Work Day

Ride to Work Day is a good way to start commuting by bike and generate interest among staff in your workplace. It will also help you gauge the level of interest in cycling and the adequacy of your bike facilities. Ride to Work Day will take place on Wednesday 15 October. More information about the event

Bike-friendly workplaces

Find out what facilities and support is available for cyclists in your workplace. Good bicycle facilities include secure undercover bicycle parking, showers and changing rooms and a place to store clothes. Some organisations have bike fleets available for short work trips or workplace bicycle user groups.


Page last updated: 10 Jun 2014