Sample building plans

Heritage

The Heritage Overlay of the Planning Scheme implements the State’s heritage policies and reflects the objectives of the Municipal Strategic Statement to protect the City’s heritage, including individual buildings, precincts, trees, structures and places.

The Heritage Overlay (Department of Sustainability and Environment) also describes when a permit is required in relation to a property listed in the Schedule to the Heritage Overlay.

To check if a property is heritage listed, search the Schedule to the Heritage Overlay (Department of Sustainability and Environment).

Heritage controls FAQs

Q. Can I demolish my house/building?

A. The intent of any heritage control is to preserve the heritage of an area. If a building contributes to the heritage of an area, a permit for demolition may not be supported, depending upon its heritage significance. An appeal process does exist however and this may be used when a party does not agree with Council’s decision.

 

Q. Can I build a new front fence?

A. A permit would be required to build a front fence on land which falls within a heritage overlay. The individual area heritage guidelines would be used to assist property owners to design an appropriate style of fencing.

 

Q. Will I be allowed to paint my house?

A. In designated heritage precincts a permit would not be required to paint previously painted surfaces. A small number of individually listed properties may have controls requiring a permit for painting but this is dependent upon the characteristics of the particular properties. If in doubt, contact Council on 9599 4444.

 

Q. Can I make changes or alterations to the inside of a building?

A. A permit is not required for internal alterations unless a property is specifically nominated in the Planning Scheme as requiring a permit for these types of works. There are very few buildings in Bayside to which this applies. If in doubt, contact Council on 9599 4444. 

 

Q. Do I need a permit for external alterations?

A. Yes. External alterations to the visible elements of heritage buildings will be considered in terms of the impact on the building and precinct, whereas extensions to the rear of the building will take account of the fact that there may be a lower level of impact. Council encourages you to make an appointment, free of charge, with council planning staff to discuss your options.

 

Q. What is the City of Bayside Heritage Review (1999)?

A. The City of Bayside Heritage Review was commissioned by the Bayside City Council to examine heritage structures, precincts and landscapes within the former Cities of Brighton, Sandringham and those parts of the former Cities of Moorabbin and Mordialloc-Cheltenham, Highett and Beaumaris which now form the City of Bayside.

Conducted in 1999 by Allom Lovell and Associates Pty Ltd, the study included a review of Andrew Ward’s two previous studies, the City of Brighton Urban Character and Conservation Study (1986) and the City of Sandringham Heritage and Conservation Study (1989).

Individual structures were given a classification (A, B or C) according to their heritage significance. Twenty-seven areas, known as heritage overlay precincts were deemed to be of heritage significance. These were also identified and contributory buildings were ranked A, B or C within the precinct boundary.

 

Q. Where can I find this report?

A. Copies of the five volume draft report, City of Bayside Heritage Review are available for inspection at the City of Bayside Corporate Centre and Bayside Municipal libraries. Volumes 2, 3 and 4 are available below:

 

Q. How were heritage properties graded?

A. Structures were given A, B or C grading following assessment as part of the City of Bayside Heritage Review (1999).

  • 'Grade A' structures are places of individual cultural significance and are integral to the historic nature of the City of Bayside. They are also of sufficient significance to be considered for inclusion on the Victorian Heritage Register and the Register of the National Estate. Criteria for identifying an A grade structure include rarity or uniqueness, good design or the potential to educate, illustrate or provide further scientific investigation in relation to Victoria’s cultural heritage. The demolition of these buildings would have a fundamental adverse impact on the cultural heritage of Bayside as demonstrated by its built environment and historic urban fabric.
  • 'Grade B' structures are those that are integral to the cultural significance of the City of Bayside as a whole, through their architectural integrity and/or their historical associations. They are of sufficient significance to be considered for inclusion on the Register of the National Estate. The demolition of these buildings would adversely impact upon the cultural heritage of Bayside as demonstrated by its built environment and historic urban fabric.
  • 'Grade C' structures contribute to the architectural or historic character and cohesiveness of the City of Bayside and as such are either of local importance or interest. They are generally residential buildings and are close to Grade B buildings in their period and type but have had substantial alterations made to their original fabric. The demolition of C graded buildings would have an adverse impact upon the cultural heritage of Bayside as demonstrated by its built environment and historic urban fabric.

The report made the following recommendations:

  • That all buildings graded A and B located outside precincts and which are listed in Volume 2 of the study are recommended for Heritage Overlay Protection under the Bayside Planning Scheme.
  • That all precincts described in Volume 3 of the study are recommended for Heritage Overlay Protection under the Bayside Planning Scheme.
  • That all landscapes which are listed in Volume 4 and are located outside precincts are recommended for Heritage Overlay Protection under the Bayside Planning Scheme.


Q. What is the Inter-war and Post-war Heritage Study 2008?

A. A study was prepared on inter-war and post-war heritage in Bayside (the Inter-war & Post-war Heritage Study 2008).

The study contains two volumes:

  • Volume 1: contains an introduction and methodology; a review of the 1999 Allom Lovell thematic history; new proposed heritage precincts (eight in total); a review of 47 inter-war heritage properties currently with interim status in the schedule to the heritage overlay in the Bayside Planning Scheme.
  • Volume 2: contains data sheets/citation for 69 additional properties inter-war and post-war properties and any other properties from other eras that were excluded from the Allom Lovell 1999 Heritage Review.

The May 2008 version of the Study is available online (see below), at all Council libraries, and at the Corporate Centre (76 Royal Avenue, Sandringham):

A hard copy version can be mailed by calling 9599 4444. Please note: Due to the size, there is a $10 printing charge for the complete colour copy of the study.


Page last updated: 04 May 2016